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Black History Month Events: There’s still time to attend.

If you decide to attend any of these events, make sure you call first for hours, costs and more information.

In honor of Black History Month, the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) offers a variety of activities for visitors of all ages. Enjoy live music, films, art-making workshops and more.

The Detroit Institute of Arts is celebrating Black History Month, with a variety of films, exhibits and more.

At Henry Ford Museum , Black History Month is a time of celebration and examination, a time of assessment and questioning. Select days each week during February, we explore a different aspect of African-American history, from the northern migration and the roots of civil rights history to the triumphs and challenges of the present day.

You’ll find music, drama, interactive exhibits and more at the Henry Ford Museum’s celebration of Black History Month.

Check out the beautiful display of quilts and fiber arts at the Detroit Unity Temple. The display is called “The Civil Rights: And the Stitch Goes On.” It features quilts and fiber arts made by a variety of artisans from around the metro Detroit area.

Quilt and Fiber Arts Display

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora.  It is time dedicated to celebrating the achievements, milestones, events, and contributions made by members of the African American community.

Today, we celebrate the first African American elected President of the United States

Barack Hussein Obama ll

 

Born in Honolulu on August 4, 1961


Obama is the 44th President that took the oath of office on January 20, 2009 was re-elected in November of 2012 and is currently serving his second term in office.

 


President Barack Obama visited the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, January 20, 2016 and later delivered remarks on Detroit’s economic recovery and the state of the U.S. auto industry at the UAW-GM CHR.

Warren Shadd

 

Warren Shadd, the CEO of Shadd Pianos & Keyboard, USA, is the first African-American piano manufacturer in the world. Now a top player in his field, Shadd’s pianos are in high demand and have been featured everywhere from concerts to top television series.

Shadd, a Washington, D.C. area native and Howard University graduate, was a child prodigy drummer who played his first concert at the age of 4. As word of his talent spread, he was the subject to ugly incidents of racism. One of the most chilling came as an eight-year-old in 1964, when someone made violent threats against his parents ahead of a Jazz In Concert series he was set to play at Washington’s Watergate hotel.

Gabby Douglas

Gabby Douglas

Gabrielle Douglas was born on December 31, 1995, in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Gabby Douglas began formal gymnastics training at 6 years old and won a state championship by the time she was 8. She moved away from her hometown and family in 2010 to pursue training with a world-renowned Olympic trainer, and was selected to compete with the U.S. Olympic women's gymnastics team at the 2012 Summer Olympics. There, Douglas became the first African American to win gold in the individual all-around event. She also won a team gold medal with teammates Aly Raisman, Kyla Ross, McKayla Maroney and Jordyn Wieber.

Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King

Civil rights activist Coretta Scott King was born in Heiberger, Alabama to Obie and Bernice Scott on April 27, 1927. She majored in education and music at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Because the local school system would not allow her to practice teach, Scott decided to pursue a career in music and enrolled in the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. While there, she met Martin Luther King, Jr. After a brief courtship, they married in 1953. The next year, she and King moved to Montgomery, Alabama, where he became minister of the Drexel Avenue Baptist Church and helped launch the civil rights movement. Coretta Scott King became active in the movement. After her husband’s assassination in 1968, Mrs. King continued her civil rights activities, founding the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, Georgia. Coretta Scott King served as the center’s president and chief executive officer from 1968 to 1995, when she stepped down and was succeeded by her youngest son, Dexter Scott King. She died on January 30, 2006.

Josephine Holloway

Meet Josephine Holloway a champion of diversity within the Girl Scout Movement and one of the first African American Girl Scout troop leaders.

 


Josephine developed her passion for serving girls early on when she held a position at Nashville’s Bethlehem Center, a shelter for at-risk women and children. No stranger to the work Girl Scouts did in the community, Josephine dreamed of bringing that kind of programming to girls at the center, and in 1924, she had the opportunity to do just that. By the end of the year, more than 300 girls there were engaged in Girl Scout-inspired activities.

Josephine Holloway

Vernice Armour

Vernice Armour

Vernice Armour is a former United States Marine Corps officer who was the first African-American female naval aviator in the Marine Corps and the first African American female combat pilot in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Henry T. Sampson

Henry T. Sampson

Henry T. Sampson the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering in the United States. He graduated from Lanier High School in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1951. He then attended Morehouse College in Atlanta, before transferring to Purdue University in Indiana, where he became a member of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He received a Bachelor's degree in science from Purdue University in 1956. He graduated with a MS degree in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1961. Sampson also received an MS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1965, and his PhD in 1967.

Clara Belle Williams

Clara Belle Williams

Clara Belle Williams was the first African-American graduate of New Mexico State University. Williams was born Clara Belle Drisdale in Plum, Texas in October 1885.

W.E.B. Du Bois

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois

Known as arguably one of the most intelligent individuals to ever live, W.E.B. Du Bois was instrumental in bringing along the process of human rights for African-American's. In a time when the despotic and abundant prejudice and bigotry towards African-Americans was not only tolerated, it was with reason and law.

Du Bois was the first African-American to earn a PH.D from Harvard University. He was also the founding member of what we know today to be the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People).

Macon Bolling Allen

Macon Bolling Allen

Macon Bolling Allen was the first black-American Justice of the Peace (1848) and the first African-American to pass the bar and practice law in the United States (1845). He is believed to be the first black to ever hold a judiciary position in the United States, despite not being considered a citizen throughout most of his pursuit.

Ruth Simmons

Ruth Simmons

Ruth Simmons (born Ruth Jean Stubblefield; July 3, 1945) was the 18th president of Brown University, the first black president of an Ivy League institution. Simmons was elected Brown's first female president in November 2000. Simmons assumed office in fall of 2001. Simmons holds appointments as a professor in the Departments of Comparative Literature and Africana Studies.